SHH Symposium Break-Out Sessions

Curriculum and Teaching


The intersection of patient and clinician stories: Applying the principles of Narrative Medicine to conversations about life-limiting conditions
11:10am-12:00pm
Benson 401 A

**THIS SESSION IS NOW FULL**

Mollie Rose Canzona, PhD
Asst Professor, Dept of Communication; Dept of Social Sciences & Health Policy
Wake Forest University
Rolland J. Barrett, MD
Gynecologic Oncology
Novant Health Oncology Specialists
Deborah Love, JD, MBA, MA
Sr. Director Bioethics, Spiritual Care and Healing Arts
Novant Health
Joanne S. Henley, MDiv, BCC
Corporate Director, Spiritual Care
Novant Health
Sara Bridges, MSW, LCSW
Palliative Care Counselor
Novant Health
Sherry Dunevant, RN, MSN
Sr. Director Physician Services, Education and Training
Novant Health
Adam Koontz, MA LPC-S
Corporate Manager of Advance Care Planning
Novant Health
Sharon E. Nelson, BS
Patient Services: Program Manager, Integrative Arts
Novant Health

Description:
Panelists will discuss the process of developing, conducting, and evaluating a narrative-based workshop for interdisciplinary groups of health care professionals who care for patients with life-limiting conditions. Workshop participants engage narrative in three forms: viewing narratives, writing and sharing narratives, and co-constructing narratives through patient-clinician simulation and reflection. Baseline and post-workshop surveys and interviews are used to tailor workshop content, gauge feasibility, assess participant learning, and explore implications for practice and well-being.


Lesson Plans: Types of Narrative Medicine Teaching Sessions
11:10am-12:00pm
Benson 401 C

Sonia Crandall, MS, PhD
Professor & Director for Research and Scholarship
Department of Physician Assistant Studies
Wake Forest School of Medicine
Tanya Gregory, PhD
Assistant Professor & Director, Office of Academic Excellence
Department of Physician Assistant Studies
Wake Forest School of Medicine
Aimee Mepham, MFA
Assistant Director, Humanities Institute
Wake Forest University

In this session, three Wake Forest faculty who have taught narrative medicine sessions to medical learners will describe some of their more successful “lesson plans” and talk with attendees about how to develop such sessions themselves. The “lesson plans” to be discussed include using a clinician narrative to introduce narrative medicine and narrative competence to PA students; asking medical students to write a one-act play based on a memorable encounter with a patient, family member, or colleague; and using a timed writing and listening exercise to practice transcribing another person’s story as well as describing the experience of being heard.

Bios:
Sonia Crandall is a professor and director for research and scholarship in the Wake Forest PA program. She has a PhD in Adult and Community Education and 25 years of experience as a medical educator. She joined the Department of PA Studies in 2010, after 18 years as a faculty member in the Department of Family and Community Medicine. For 10 years she directed a fourth-year, 4-week medical student elective, “Narrative Medicine: The Lost Art of Listening to the Patient’s Story,” that helped learners to explore the expanding, cutting-edge field of narrative medicine and investigate how the application of interpretive literary skills to the practice of medicine can effect wise and ethical action.

Tanya Gregory is an assistant professor in the Wake Forest PA program. Before coming to Wake 4 years ago, she was the editor of JAAPA, the national PA journal, and is an experienced writer, editor, and manager of medical journals. She has a PhD in English and American literature and has also taught literature and writing to undergraduates. She is the course director for the Graduate Project in the PA Program and co-course director for Sacred 7, a health humanities elective that she and a colleague launched in the summer of 2014. She also teaches narrative medicine sessions within the Being a PA course and directs the Office of Academic Excellence and Writing Center within PA Studies.

Aimee Mepham holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Washington University in St. Louis. She has taught creative writing workshops at Indiana University, Washington University in St. Louis, Salem College, and Wake Forest University. Her work has appeared in Meridian, River Styx, Opium Magazine, and others, and has been performed twice by Liars’ League NYC. She is currently the Assistant Director of the Humanities Institute at Wake Forest University.


Narrative and Bioethics in Medical Education
11:10am-12:00pm
Benson 401 B/D

**THIS SESSION IS NOW FULL**

Nancy MP King, JD
Professor, Department of Social Sciences & Health Policy and Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine
Wake Forest School of Medicine
Co-Director, Center for Bioethics, Health, & Society and Graduate Program in Bioethics
Wake Forest University

Description:
A workshop that illustrates the use of close reading and discussion (and sometimes writing) of different types of narratives to illuminate issues in bioethics, and/or aspects of the patient’s experience and social and cultural influences on health and health care. This close reading, writing, and discussion asks students to reflect on aspects of their own experience with health, illness, and medical care that may have been out-of-awareness, so that they recognize the many ways in which all patients’ views about their health are embedded in social and cultural contexts that they have been learning since childhood. This helps to counter medical students’ desire to regard health and illness as entirely objective, data-driven, and measurable, and helps graduate bioethics students to understand ethical issues in the physician-patient relationship in a broader societal framework.

Bio:
Nancy M. P. King, JD, is Professor in the Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy and Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine at Wake Forest School of Medicine, and Co-Director of the Center for Bioethics, Health, and Society and the Graduate Program in Bioethics at Wake Forest University. Her scholarship addresses a range of bioethics issues, including: informed consent, benefit, and uncertainty in health care and research; the development and use of experimental technologies; preclinical and animal research; international and cross-cultural questions in human subjects research; and ethical issues in “big data” research and biobanking, gene transfer research, regenerative medicine, and other novel biotechnologies. She has published over 100 scholarly articles and book chapters, and is co-editor of The Social Medicine Reader (2nd ed., Duke University Press, 2005), Beyond Regulations: Ethics in Human Subjects Research (UNC Press 1999), and Bioethics, Public Moral Argument, and Social Responsibility (Routledge 2012).


The Sacred Seven: Integrating Humanities in Physician Assistant Education
2:00-2:50pm
Benson 409

Jill P. Grant, PA-C, MMS, MS
Director of Clinical Education
Assistant Professor
Department of Physician Assistant Studies
Wake Forest School of Medicine

Tanya Gregory, PhD
Assistant Professor & Director, Office of Academic Excellence
Department of Physician Assistant Studies
Wake Forest School of Medicine

Description:
The session will provide an overview of Sacred 7, an innovative health humanities elective within the Wake Forest PA Program. The course uses literature, film, visual arts, writing (including writing of parallel charts during clinical training), reflection, meditation, and discussion to help PA students access, explore, and deepen their empathy, compassion, humility, integrity, reflection, resilience, and self-awareness – the qualities that constitute the Sacred 7. The overall goal of the course is to help them become PAs who care humanely for patients and for themselves.

Bios:
Jill Grant is a physician assistant and assistant professor in the Wake Forest PA program. She is currently a Clinical Coordinator for the program, helping to oversee the clinical phase of education. She is also the co-course director for Sacred 7, a health humanities elective she and co-presenter Dr. Tanya Gregory developed for first-year PA students. Mrs. Grant has practiced clinically as a physician assistant in both orthopedics and perioperative medicine. Her professional interests include the integration of medical humanities into PA education, the ultimate goal of which is to enhance the ability of her students to relate well to their future patients and colleagues.

Tanya Gregory is an assistant professor in the Wake Forest PA program. Before coming to Wake 4 years ago, she was the editor of JAAPA, the national PA journal, and is an experienced writer, editor, and manager of medical journals. She has a PhD in English and American literature and has also taught literature and writing to undergraduates. She is the course director for the Graduate Project in the PA Program and co-course director for Sacred 7, a health humanities elective that she and a colleague launched in the summer of 2014. She also teaches narrative medicine sessions within the Being a PA course and directs the Office of Academic Excellence and Writing Center within PA Studies.

Narrative in Clinical Practice


When You Know Too Much
2:00-2:50pm
Benson 401 B/D

Erich J. Grant MMS, PA-C
Assistant Professor
Vice Chair, Education and Curricular Innovation
Department of Physician Assistant Studies
Wake Forest School of Medicine

Description:
When a medical provider’s best friend suddenly becomes gravely ill, worlds of personal memories, clinical training and grief collide. This session documents and explores the internal narrative and external projections of a medical provider who knew too much about his best friend’s illness and prognosis.

Bio:
Erich Grant is Winston-Salem native who completed his Master degree and PA training at the Wake Forest School of Medicine PA Program, where he currently serves as Vice Chair for Education and Curricular Innovation. His clinical practice is within the J. Paul Sticht Center for Aging and Rehabilitation, specializing in inpatient physical rehabilitation.


Narrative and Communication in Clinical Practice
2:00-2:50pm
Benson 401 A

**THIS SESSION IS NOW FULL**

Peter R. Lichstein, MD
Professor, General Internal Medicine
Wake Forest Baptist Health

Marcia Wofford, MD
Professor, Pediatrics
Associate Dean of Student Affairs
Wake Forest School of Medicine

Description:
This session will introduce participants to the WFSOM Program to Enhance Relationship Centered Communication (PERCC), a facilitated training program that teaches clinicians practical skills to strengthen their relationships with patients and families and improve the effectiveness of medical care. PERCC, Program to Enhance Relationhip-Centered Communication.

Bios:
Peter Lichstein, Professor of General Internal Medicine, teaches with a special emphasis on communication skills, professionalism, bedside clinical skills and team-based care. He co-directed the AACH training program, is Director of the General Medicine unit at WFBH, and serves as the Governor of the North Carolina Chapter of the American College of Physicians 2015-2019.

Marcia Wofford is a pediatric hematologist-oncologist at the Wake Forest School of Medicine (WFSM) where she is also the associate dean of student affairs. Dr. Wofford graduated from Millsaps College and received her medical degree from the University of Mississippi School of Medicine, where she also completed an internship and a residency in pediatrics. She completed a fellowship in pediatric hematology and oncology at Wake Forest School of Medicine before joining the WFSM faculty in 1988.


Spirituality, Health, and Healing: Encountering Faith Narratives in Clinical Settings
2:00-2:50pm
Benson 410

**THIS SESSION IS NOW FULL**

F. Keith Stirewalt, PA, MBA, MDiv
Chaplain for Clinical Engagement & Independent Living Donor Advocate
Wake Forest Baptist Health

Description:
Patients bring, tell and live out different kinds of stories in their experiences of illness. Oftentimes, they provide or allude to narratives of faith through explicit and subtle means.
This workshop explores how we we encounter these faith narratives, what we can learn from them, and how we respond to them.

Bio:
F. Keith Stirewalt is the Chaplain for Clinical Engagement and Living Donor Advocate for Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He received his PA as a Physician Assistant from Wake Forest School of Medicine, his MBA from UNC-Greensboro, and his MDiv from Wake Forest University School of Divinity. After graduation from divinity school, he completed two years of chaplain residency from the School of Pastoral Care at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. Keith’s work and passion center on the interaction of clinical medicine, theology, end-of-life, and bioethics.


“Writing Diabetes: Researching the Significance of Composing Illness Narratives”
2:00-2:50pm
Benson 401 C

**THIS SESSION IS NOW FULL**

Jen Stockwell, PhD student
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Beth Hanson
, Medical Student
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Maebelle Mathew
, undergraduate researcher
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Laura Young, MD, PhD
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
UNC School of Medicine

Description:
Developed by a cross-disciplinary and cross-rank research team, the Writing Diabetes Project was designed to investigate the influence of writing on health. In particular, this project focuses on diabetes management. During an eight-week writing workshop, participants practiced various writing techniques and worked on crafting short narratives. Researchers are currently in the process of analyzing participant’s writings, baseline and follow-up surveys, and biometric data (A1c levels). In this presentation, researchers will outline the development of this study, review initial findings, and discuss possible implications for healthcare research and providers.

 

Reading, Writing, Listening


“No Body Stops Dreaming:”  Examining Health Disparities through Narrative
11:10am-12:00pm
Benson 406

**THIS SESSION IS NOW FULL**

Rafael Campo, MA, MD, DLitt(Hon)
Associate Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School

Description:
The earliest of civilizations, from many Native American cultures to that of the ancient Greeks, recognized an inextricable interrelationship between poetry and healing; surely, the best poems we have today demand that we listen, and not just with our ears, but with our whole hearts. In this seminar, we’ll examine the ways in which poems join us empathetically, through their sound and structure as much as through their insistent invitations to share our diverse human experiences. We’ll ponder how poems can make effective use of the richly complex tensions between such linked notions as authorship/authority, confession/ confinement, hyperbole/humility, and identity/immunity. To best achieve our goals, we’ll devote some time to reading together works by such well-known poets as Nikky Finney, Thom Gunn, Marilyn Hacker, Vaneta Masson, Frank O’Hara, and William Carlos Williams.
Goals: 1) To explore and understand the link between creative self-expression and healing; 2) To define a “biocultural” narrative of the illness experience, in contrast to the restrictive biomedical narrative encountered in most health care settings; 3) To investigate the ancient and profound connections between language, art, and therapeusis; 4) To develop strategies for integrating humanistic work in the delivery of more equitable, cross-culturally sensitive health care. Doctors, nurses, and other allied health professionals will benefit, as will people living with illness.
Suggested readings: Illness as Metaphor and AIDS and Its Metaphors, by Susan Sontag (Picador; September 2001); Illness and Culture in the Postmodern Age, by David Morris (University of California Press, 2000); The Cancer Journals, by Audre Lorde (Aunt Lute Books, 1997); Winter Numbers, by Marilyn Hacker (W.W. Norton, 1996); The Man With Night Sweats by Thom Gunn (Noonday Press, 1993).

Bio:
Rafael Campo is a poet and essayist who teaches and practices internal medicine at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. Campo earned a BA and MA from Amherst College and an MD from Harvard Medical School. His primary care practice serves mostly Latinos, gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgendered people, and people with HIV infection. Campo is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including a Guggenheim fellowship, a National Poetry Series award, and a Lambda Literary Award for his poetry, and an honorary Doctor of Literature degree from Amherst College.


Listening for Story
11:10am-12:00pm
Benson 410

**THIS SESSION IS NOW FULL**

Phoebe Zerwick
Associate Professor of the Practice
Journalism/Writing Program, Department of English
Wake Forest University

Description: 
The workshop will introduce students to the the journalist’s method of interviewing for story, with attention to asking open-ended questions journalists use to and to listening for the detail that reveal a narrative. The instructor will provide examples of productive interviews for students to hear as well as examples from her own work in preparation for a guided workshop in which students will discover each others’ narratives.

Bio:
Phoebe Zerwick is an investigative journalist, narrative writer, and web-based documentary maker who teaches writing and journalism at Wake Forest University, where she is an associate professor of the practice in the English Department. In her journalism and documentary work, she specializes in humanizing complex issues through story. Most recently, she has focused on stories of reproductive health, the refugee crisis, and poverty. You may find samples of her work at: http://www.phoebezerwick.com/.


Writing about Illness and Care
2:00-2:50pm
Benson 406

**THIS SESSION IS NOW FULL**

Aimee Mepham, MFA
Assistant Director, Humanities Institute
Wake Forest University

Description:
In this workshop, participants will discuss how to build habits of a reflective writing practice that can enhance relationships between caregiver and patient as well as incorporating self-care. Participants will be guided through a series of creative writing prompts/exercises that will allow them to practice free writing and have a chance to share them with the group.

Bio:
Aimee Mepham holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Washington University in St. Louis. She has taught creative writing workshops at Indiana University, Washington University in St. Louis, Salem College, and Wake Forest University. Her work has appeared in Meridian, River Styx, Opium Magazine, and others, and has been performed twice by Liars’ League NYC. She is currently the Assistant Director of the Humanities Institute at Wake Forest University.